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Archive of entries posted on February 2011

A COUNTRY PHILOSOPHER

Having commended the poetry of Frank Stanton, here is one of my favorites from him which might be useful for a Monday and comes to my mind since my travel plans this weekend were interrupted by a snow storm. “A Country Philosopher” The cold has killed the corn off an’ blighted all the wheat; The […]

“Thoroughly Drenched in the Word”

Here is another excerpt from Adam Nicolson’s, God’s Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible. Here Nicolson is describing the widespread attentiveness to Scripture and the in depth, intense preaching of the day. Something to aspire to: “…week after week, preachers would occupy their pulpits analysing texts, pursuing moral and theological arguments, exercising the […]

Poet, Frank L. Stanton

I have commented several times here on the value of poetry. One poet I particularly appreciate is Frank L. Stanton (1857-1927), who was the first poet laureate of Georgia.  His poems are primarily a celebration of the simple pleasures of life rooted in the rural South.  I recently acquired a book of his poems which […]

KJV, Language & Meaning

Adam Nicolson, in God’s Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible, contrasts the careful, rich use of language found in the King James with the more recent New English Bible.  I think he is absolutely right. “The flattening of language is a flattening of meaning.  Language which is not taut with a sense of […]

“The Word was his world”

Adam Nicolson, in his book, God’s Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible, describes Puritans this way: “A puritan ate and drank the word of God. That word was his world.” (123) Nicolson does not intend this as a compliment, and there were errors of various sorts associated with various ones known as”Puritan.” However, […]

Sweet Harmony of Grace in the Congregation

Henry Barrow was a 17th century Puritan pastor imprisoned and eventually executed for his faith. After three years of imprisonment in despicable conditions, having not been outdoors in that time, Anglican officials visited him to convince him of his errors.  Being unsuccessful he bishop quipped that Barrow should enjoy his opportunity for solitude.  In response, […]